/page/2

curvesincolor:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.

Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.

People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.

(Source: cloudyskiesandcatharsis, via xulaxicana)

dontfindmearishta said: What's it like as a Muslim Feminist? Can you shed some light on this topic because so many people have this misconception that being a feminist and a Muslim at the same time is a bad thing?

queenfoisback:

I love questions like this! 

As Muslim feminists we face criticism from two aspects:

  • Criticism from muslims who think we’re “westernizing” Islam
  • Criticism from non muslims who think Islam is misogynistic

The simple answer to both is that feminism doesn’t try to change Islam, rather Islam has always had feminism built into it. Actually, it’s quite debatable that Islam invented feminism.

The Quran was revealed 632 AD, with numerous verses labelling men and women as equals. In 632 AD, Muslim women were given rights (through the Quran, as well as through prophet Mohammad pbuh). Rights that western women only earned early 20th century. 

Actually, while 16th century western men were deciding whether women have souls or not, 1st century Muslim women were already given the right to divorce, to work, to educate and be educated, to inheritance, to their own land and property, to half their husband’s wealth, to choose who to marry, to have their own opinions, and to be treated as equals to men (and on and on and on).  

Some of the verses from the Quran (revealed in 632 AD) include:

  • “And their Lord responded to them: ‘I never fail to reward any worker among you for any work you do, be you male or female - you are equal to one another.” [Quran 3:195] 
  • "As for those who lead a righteous life, male or female, while believing, they enter Paradise; without the slightest injustice.” [Quran 4:124] 
  • "Whoever works righteousness whether male or female, while he (or she) is a believer- We will surely cause him (or her) to live a good life, and We will surely give them their reward (in the hereafter) according to the best of what they used to do" [Quran 16:97]
  • "O you who believe! You are forbidden to inherit women against their will. Nor should you treat them with harshness"…"live with them on a footing of kindness and equity" [Quran 4:19] 

Islam teaches that regardless of gender (or race), in the sight of God we are judged according to the good we do, and our level of faith. If God clearly mentions that men and women are equal to one another, why should anyone else act like men are superior? Superiority comes from culture, and that is the common misconception that people tie to religion. 

Now a question I always get is why Muslim feminists feel the need to use the word “feminist” if Islam already has feminism built into it. The simple answer is that even Muslims don’t know Islam has feminism built into it (hence the reason for the criticism we get), and that using the title “Muslim” no longer makes a statement that as a Muslim, you are aware of women’s rights. Islam definitely has feminism built into it, but not all Muslims apply that. Which is why we feel the need to use a separate word (in this case, feminist) to make that statement. 

coolchicksfromhistory:

Louise Bourgeois Boursier (1563–1636)
Art by Zoe Kierce (tumblr)
Louise was the royal midwife to the court of Henry IV of France.  She delivered all six of Marie de Medici’s children, including Louis XIII.  After the delivery of the couple’s last child, Henrietta Maria, Henry IV awarded Louise an annual pension of 300 livres.
In 1609, Louise published a detailed obstetrics textbook which treated childbirth as a natural process requiring little intervention.  It was so popular that Louise published three expanded editions between 1617 and 1634.  It was also translated into Latin, German, Dutch, and English.  Louise’s book remained a standard text until the early 1700s.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Louise Bourgeois Boursier (1563–1636)

Art by Zoe Kierce (tumblr)

Louise was the royal midwife to the court of Henry IV of France.  She delivered all six of Marie de Medici’s children, including Louis XIII.  After the delivery of the couple’s last child, Henrietta Maria, Henry IV awarded Louise an annual pension of 300 livres.

In 1609, Louise published a detailed obstetrics textbook which treated childbirth as a natural process requiring little intervention.  It was so popular that Louise published three expanded editions between 1617 and 1634.  It was also translated into Latin, German, Dutch, and English.  Louise’s book remained a standard text until the early 1700s.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE
Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."
-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.
In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE

Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."

-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.

In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.

layalnoureddine:

awaitingmyescapee:

The guinness world records: Youngest doctor in the world 

Eqbal Asa’d is a Palestinian Muslim refugee in Lebanon that started Med school when she was 14 years old. She got her Bachelor degree in Medicine with Honors and and was set by the Guinness World Records as the youngest doctor in the World. She is now signed to continue her studies in Ohio to become a pediatrician. 

Fucking badass

(via ankylosaur)

"What makes you such a bitch, Emma?"
"Breeding, darling. Top class breeding."

(Source: hcrryosborn, via americachavez)

http://skidsgetaway.tumblr.com/post/88607430463

kaniehtiio:

deadsmondmiles:

mythicgamerx:

deadsmondmiles:

thanks to this shit storm im composing a letter to ubisoft instead of doing my homework so i can pass english

I’m going to get hate for this but I need to speak my mind. I have personally done work on game programming and it is easier to animate a male character as opposed to a female character. Why? Because the body structure is different! Females look different from males. They move different, they act different. Besides, even if it was easier to animate females it still wouldn’t fit with the theme. The setting is during the French Revolution! One of the bloodiest time periods in history and women had almost no rights during this time period. I’m not trying to be sexist, I support gender equality, however if you want to get pissed at a great game company because the main character doesn’t have a pair of tits be my guest. I will be happily playing AC: Unity once I get a PS4.

you really wanna do this buddy??? you really want to???????

wouldn’t fit with the theme? do you even know a fucking thing about the french revolution? actually do you know anything about assassin’s creed because the whole fuckin point is fighting for freedom and i fail to see how playing as a woman would disprove that point. also do you know women’s history at all? women have always been on the forefronts of revolutions and social upheavals. ALWAYS. A L W A Y S. our history and our support and our SUCCESS has been erased time and time again but it’s still fucking there. time to read it, hun.

people are pissed because ubisoft has animated females. they have an entire game featuring a woman and every co-op so far has had multiple female characters. they know how to fucking do it. women aren’t some kind of magical unicorn creature with fifty legs. 

charlotte corday was executed by guillotine in 1793 for the assassination (WOMAN ASSASSIN RIGHT HERE) of jean paul marat. marat was a radical politician and journalist who was one of the most radical voices of the revolution. she stabbed him to death, in his bath tub. she posthumously name the angel of assassination. she testified that she carried out the assassination alone and that killing that one man would save the lives of 100,000 others.

claire lacombe, or red rosa, was a founding member of the society of revolutionary republican women along with pauline leon. the group became so notorious, within just five months, that the national convention specifically banned WOMENS organisations. it was attended by up to 180 women. claire lacombe FOUGHT with the rebels in 1792 at the storming of tuileries where she was SHOT THROUGH THE ARM but carried on fighting anyway which earnt her the name “heroine of august tenth” and for her bravery she was awarded a civic crown. she was arrested in april 1794 and released august 1795. 

olympe de gouges was a playwright feminist abolitionist and advocate for the improvement of conditions for slaves in the colonies. she wrote the declaration of the rights of women and the female citizen demanding woman have EQUAL rights to men, she challenged male-female inequality and and the male authority. she was excecuted by guillotine.

pauline leon suggested the a female militia so women could protect their homes from counter revolutionary assaults. she requested that women were given permission to arm themselves with sabers, rifles, pikes and pistols as well as the privilege of drilling under the french guard. the request was denied. she co founded the society of revolutionary republican women with claire lacombe and when it was shut down moved onto be the leader of femmes sans culottes.

theroigne de mericourt in 1789 was caricatured by the parisian royalist press as the female war chief and according to their pamphlets she assaulted the bastille and lead the womens march on versailles, fought soldiers, was to be found where unrest was greatest. by her own accounts she did none of these but did attend debates at the national assembly and in 1792 made a call for the creation of “legions of amazons” in order to protect the revolution. As part of her call, she claimed that the right to bear arms would transform women into citizens. she was arrested, publicly flogged and spent the rest of her life in an asylum. 

there’s also the women’s march on versailles which was one of the earliest AND most significant events in the revolution and began because women were rioting over the high price of bread. 
militant women carried the bathtub and blood stained shirt of the assassinated marat as part of his funeral procession.
at the constitution of 1793 women were at the fore of the crown demanding bread and when their cries went unnoticed, the women went on a rampage, “sacking shops, seizing grain and kidnapping officials.”

women had next to no rights PRE revolution but the rise of feminists during the revolution changed things. WOMEN WERE IMPORTANT. WOMEN FOUGHT AND WERE POLITICAL AND PHYSICAL AND WOMEN DID CONTRIBUTE TO THE REVOLUTION ON BOTH SIDE and i didn’t even write about everything. women played a very important role so stop pretending they didn’t. you can read more here and hell even wikipedia is good on this too.

(via spacefeels)

Thom Yorke – Atoms For Peace

literaryjukebox:

It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. I simply can’t build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery, and death. I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that this cruelty too shall end, and that peace & tranquility will return once again.

Anne Frank (June 12, 1929 – early March 1945) in The Diary of a Young Girl

Song: “Atoms for Peace” by Thom Yorke

annstreetstudio:

Keeping the history and culture of traditional weaving alive through Threads of Life…

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

curvesincolor:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.

Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.

People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.

(Source: cloudyskiesandcatharsis, via xulaxicana)

dontfindmearishta said: What's it like as a Muslim Feminist? Can you shed some light on this topic because so many people have this misconception that being a feminist and a Muslim at the same time is a bad thing?

queenfoisback:

I love questions like this! 

As Muslim feminists we face criticism from two aspects:

  • Criticism from muslims who think we’re “westernizing” Islam
  • Criticism from non muslims who think Islam is misogynistic

The simple answer to both is that feminism doesn’t try to change Islam, rather Islam has always had feminism built into it. Actually, it’s quite debatable that Islam invented feminism.

The Quran was revealed 632 AD, with numerous verses labelling men and women as equals. In 632 AD, Muslim women were given rights (through the Quran, as well as through prophet Mohammad pbuh). Rights that western women only earned early 20th century. 

Actually, while 16th century western men were deciding whether women have souls or not, 1st century Muslim women were already given the right to divorce, to work, to educate and be educated, to inheritance, to their own land and property, to half their husband’s wealth, to choose who to marry, to have their own opinions, and to be treated as equals to men (and on and on and on).  

Some of the verses from the Quran (revealed in 632 AD) include:

  • “And their Lord responded to them: ‘I never fail to reward any worker among you for any work you do, be you male or female - you are equal to one another.” [Quran 3:195] 
  • "As for those who lead a righteous life, male or female, while believing, they enter Paradise; without the slightest injustice.” [Quran 4:124] 
  • "Whoever works righteousness whether male or female, while he (or she) is a believer- We will surely cause him (or her) to live a good life, and We will surely give them their reward (in the hereafter) according to the best of what they used to do" [Quran 16:97]
  • "O you who believe! You are forbidden to inherit women against their will. Nor should you treat them with harshness"…"live with them on a footing of kindness and equity" [Quran 4:19] 

Islam teaches that regardless of gender (or race), in the sight of God we are judged according to the good we do, and our level of faith. If God clearly mentions that men and women are equal to one another, why should anyone else act like men are superior? Superiority comes from culture, and that is the common misconception that people tie to religion. 

Now a question I always get is why Muslim feminists feel the need to use the word “feminist” if Islam already has feminism built into it. The simple answer is that even Muslims don’t know Islam has feminism built into it (hence the reason for the criticism we get), and that using the title “Muslim” no longer makes a statement that as a Muslim, you are aware of women’s rights. Islam definitely has feminism built into it, but not all Muslims apply that. Which is why we feel the need to use a separate word (in this case, feminist) to make that statement. 

coolchicksfromhistory:

Louise Bourgeois Boursier (1563–1636)
Art by Zoe Kierce (tumblr)
Louise was the royal midwife to the court of Henry IV of France.  She delivered all six of Marie de Medici’s children, including Louis XIII.  After the delivery of the couple’s last child, Henrietta Maria, Henry IV awarded Louise an annual pension of 300 livres.
In 1609, Louise published a detailed obstetrics textbook which treated childbirth as a natural process requiring little intervention.  It was so popular that Louise published three expanded editions between 1617 and 1634.  It was also translated into Latin, German, Dutch, and English.  Louise’s book remained a standard text until the early 1700s.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Louise Bourgeois Boursier (1563–1636)

Art by Zoe Kierce (tumblr)

Louise was the royal midwife to the court of Henry IV of France.  She delivered all six of Marie de Medici’s children, including Louis XIII.  After the delivery of the couple’s last child, Henrietta Maria, Henry IV awarded Louise an annual pension of 300 livres.

In 1609, Louise published a detailed obstetrics textbook which treated childbirth as a natural process requiring little intervention.  It was so popular that Louise published three expanded editions between 1617 and 1634.  It was also translated into Latin, German, Dutch, and English.  Louise’s book remained a standard text until the early 1700s.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE
Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."
-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.
In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE

Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."

-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.

In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.

layalnoureddine:

awaitingmyescapee:

The guinness world records: Youngest doctor in the world 

Eqbal Asa’d is a Palestinian Muslim refugee in Lebanon that started Med school when she was 14 years old. She got her Bachelor degree in Medicine with Honors and and was set by the Guinness World Records as the youngest doctor in the World. She is now signed to continue her studies in Ohio to become a pediatrician. 

Fucking badass

(via ankylosaur)

"What makes you such a bitch, Emma?"
"Breeding, darling. Top class breeding."

(Source: hcrryosborn, via americachavez)

http://skidsgetaway.tumblr.com/post/88607430463

kaniehtiio:

deadsmondmiles:

mythicgamerx:

deadsmondmiles:

thanks to this shit storm im composing a letter to ubisoft instead of doing my homework so i can pass english

I’m going to get hate for this but I need to speak my mind. I have personally done work on game programming and it is easier to animate a male character as opposed to a female character. Why? Because the body structure is different! Females look different from males. They move different, they act different. Besides, even if it was easier to animate females it still wouldn’t fit with the theme. The setting is during the French Revolution! One of the bloodiest time periods in history and women had almost no rights during this time period. I’m not trying to be sexist, I support gender equality, however if you want to get pissed at a great game company because the main character doesn’t have a pair of tits be my guest. I will be happily playing AC: Unity once I get a PS4.

you really wanna do this buddy??? you really want to???????

wouldn’t fit with the theme? do you even know a fucking thing about the french revolution? actually do you know anything about assassin’s creed because the whole fuckin point is fighting for freedom and i fail to see how playing as a woman would disprove that point. also do you know women’s history at all? women have always been on the forefronts of revolutions and social upheavals. ALWAYS. A L W A Y S. our history and our support and our SUCCESS has been erased time and time again but it’s still fucking there. time to read it, hun.

people are pissed because ubisoft has animated females. they have an entire game featuring a woman and every co-op so far has had multiple female characters. they know how to fucking do it. women aren’t some kind of magical unicorn creature with fifty legs. 

charlotte corday was executed by guillotine in 1793 for the assassination (WOMAN ASSASSIN RIGHT HERE) of jean paul marat. marat was a radical politician and journalist who was one of the most radical voices of the revolution. she stabbed him to death, in his bath tub. she posthumously name the angel of assassination. she testified that she carried out the assassination alone and that killing that one man would save the lives of 100,000 others.

claire lacombe, or red rosa, was a founding member of the society of revolutionary republican women along with pauline leon. the group became so notorious, within just five months, that the national convention specifically banned WOMENS organisations. it was attended by up to 180 women. claire lacombe FOUGHT with the rebels in 1792 at the storming of tuileries where she was SHOT THROUGH THE ARM but carried on fighting anyway which earnt her the name “heroine of august tenth” and for her bravery she was awarded a civic crown. she was arrested in april 1794 and released august 1795. 

olympe de gouges was a playwright feminist abolitionist and advocate for the improvement of conditions for slaves in the colonies. she wrote the declaration of the rights of women and the female citizen demanding woman have EQUAL rights to men, she challenged male-female inequality and and the male authority. she was excecuted by guillotine.

pauline leon suggested the a female militia so women could protect their homes from counter revolutionary assaults. she requested that women were given permission to arm themselves with sabers, rifles, pikes and pistols as well as the privilege of drilling under the french guard. the request was denied. she co founded the society of revolutionary republican women with claire lacombe and when it was shut down moved onto be the leader of femmes sans culottes.

theroigne de mericourt in 1789 was caricatured by the parisian royalist press as the female war chief and according to their pamphlets she assaulted the bastille and lead the womens march on versailles, fought soldiers, was to be found where unrest was greatest. by her own accounts she did none of these but did attend debates at the national assembly and in 1792 made a call for the creation of “legions of amazons” in order to protect the revolution. As part of her call, she claimed that the right to bear arms would transform women into citizens. she was arrested, publicly flogged and spent the rest of her life in an asylum. 

there’s also the women’s march on versailles which was one of the earliest AND most significant events in the revolution and began because women were rioting over the high price of bread. 
militant women carried the bathtub and blood stained shirt of the assassinated marat as part of his funeral procession.
at the constitution of 1793 women were at the fore of the crown demanding bread and when their cries went unnoticed, the women went on a rampage, “sacking shops, seizing grain and kidnapping officials.”

women had next to no rights PRE revolution but the rise of feminists during the revolution changed things. WOMEN WERE IMPORTANT. WOMEN FOUGHT AND WERE POLITICAL AND PHYSICAL AND WOMEN DID CONTRIBUTE TO THE REVOLUTION ON BOTH SIDE and i didn’t even write about everything. women played a very important role so stop pretending they didn’t. you can read more here and hell even wikipedia is good on this too.

(via spacefeels)

annstreetstudio:

Keeping the history and culture of traditional weaving alive through Threads of Life…

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

Thom Yorke – Atoms For Peace

literaryjukebox:

It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. I simply can’t build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery, and death. I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that this cruelty too shall end, and that peace & tranquility will return once again.

Anne Frank (June 12, 1929 – early March 1945) in The Diary of a Young Girl

Song: “Atoms for Peace” by Thom Yorke

About:

A collection of badass bitches that are always inspiring.

(If any of these images happen to be your creation & I haven't credited you, holla atcha gurl & I will happily amend that).

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